"Marikana" tag
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Lusikisiki locals believe muti is key in Marikana

I SPENT time earlier this year in the villages around Lusikisiki and Port St Johns, just as striking platinum miners were returning home, their pockets empty, their futures uncertain.

PROTESTING miners at Marikana shot some of their colleagues in a clash with police in August last year, a senior police officer said yesterday.
Wounds suffered by some of the dead mineworkers came from firearms seized by protesters from Lonmin mine security guards, Brigadier Adriaan Calitz said in Centurion.
He was testifying before the Farlam Commission of Inquiry into the deaths of 44 people during strike-related unrest at Lonmin’s platinum mining operations at Marikana, near Rustenburg in North West.
Thirty-four people, mostly striking miners, were shot dead on August 16 2012, and 78 were wounded when police fired on them while trying to disperse and disarm a group which had gathered on a hill near Lonmin’s mining operations.
In the preceding week, 10 people, including two policeman and two security guards, were killed near the mine.
President Jacob Zuma appointed in August last year.
Yesterday, the commission’s head of evidence leaders Geoff Budlender SC, questioned Calitz on the use of firearms and ammunition by the police officers and the protesters.
“How did it happen that some of the strikers were shot with shotgun pellets on August 16. Is it possible that some police service members had shotgun pellets, which they brought to Marikana?” Budlender asked.
He said there was a standing police order prohibiting the use of pellets in their shotguns in crowd management interventions, to avoid serious injury.
Calitz said the individuals who killed and stole firearms from Lonmin security personnel on August 12, fired shots and killed some of the mineworkers during the clash on August 16.
“If I could give my opinion, the security personnel had their arms and ammunition [pellets] taken away.
“The impression we have is that the group that took those weapons [later] used them on August 16,” he said.
Budlender asked: “You say that the strikers who were shot and killed with shotgun pellets on the 16th, were killed by their own people?” Calitz responded: “Correct.” The senior policeman said he did not have evidence to support his hypothesis. However, he said he knew that Lonmin security, including those killed on August 12, had used pellets in their firearms.
Budlender said the issue of the ammunition fired at the wounded and dead protesters was a mystery.
Post-mortem results indicated six of the mineworkers sustained injuries from shotgun pellets. Two of them died.
Calitz was one of the police commanders assigned to the operation during the labour unrest at Marikana last year.
He said the police had been threatened and told six times in the hours before the shooting, to leave the Marikana koppie (hill), where the strikers had gathered.
Earlier, Ishmael Semenya, for the police, asked Calitz whether police were sure that methods like verbal orders, use of stun grenades, water cannon, rubber bullets, and the display of force would disperse the crowd. Calitz said: “These methods always work. “People [protesters] take the easiest way out to avoid being shot or arrested.”
He rubbished claims that the mineworkers “misunderstood” the purpose of barbed wired, which led to the chaotic confrontation.
“It [the confrontation] was a deliberate by protesters,” said Calitz. — Sapa

Some miners were ‘shot by their own colleagues’

PROTESTING miners at Marikana shot some of their colleagues in a clash with police in August last year, a senior police officer said yesterday.

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Marikana – Zuma’s Sharpeville

THERE is a grave question – how long can President Jacob Zuma, his administration and the ANC escape comparison among the black electorate of the killings of black mineworkers by the police at Marikana on August 16 last year with the Sharpeville massacre, carried out by white police in March 1960?

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Court victory on costs for Marikana victims

MINERS from Lonmin’s Marikana mine have succeeded in their fight for state funding to cover the cost of their legal fees at the Farlam Commission of Inquiry.

Marikana

Marikana evidence ‘tampered with’

LAWYERS at the Marikana Commission of Inquiry yesterday accused the SA Police Service (SAPS) of lying and concocting the evidence that they presented to the commission.

PROTESTING miners at Marikana shot some of their colleagues in a clash with police in August last year, a senior police officer said yesterday.
Wounds suffered by some of the dead mineworkers came from firearms seized by protesters from Lonmin mine security guards, Brigadier Adriaan Calitz said in Centurion.
He was testifying before the Farlam Commission of Inquiry into the deaths of 44 people during strike-related unrest at Lonmin’s platinum mining operations at Marikana, near Rustenburg in North West.
Thirty-four people, mostly striking miners, were shot dead on August 16 2012, and 78 were wounded when police fired on them while trying to disperse and disarm a group which had gathered on a hill near Lonmin’s mining operations.
In the preceding week, 10 people, including two policeman and two security guards, were killed near the mine.
President Jacob Zuma appointed in August last year.
Yesterday, the commission’s head of evidence leaders Geoff Budlender SC, questioned Calitz on the use of firearms and ammunition by the police officers and the protesters.
“How did it happen that some of the strikers were shot with shotgun pellets on August 16. Is it possible that some police service members had shotgun pellets, which they brought to Marikana?” Budlender asked.
He said there was a standing police order prohibiting the use of pellets in their shotguns in crowd management interventions, to avoid serious injury.
Calitz said the individuals who killed and stole firearms from Lonmin security personnel on August 12, fired shots and killed some of the mineworkers during the clash on August 16.
“If I could give my opinion, the security personnel had their arms and ammunition [pellets] taken away.
“The impression we have is that the group that took those weapons [later] used them on August 16,” he said.
Budlender asked: “You say that the strikers who were shot and killed with shotgun pellets on the 16th, were killed by their own people?” Calitz responded: “Correct.” The senior policeman said he did not have evidence to support his hypothesis. However, he said he knew that Lonmin security, including those killed on August 12, had used pellets in their firearms.
Budlender said the issue of the ammunition fired at the wounded and dead protesters was a mystery.
Post-mortem results indicated six of the mineworkers sustained injuries from shotgun pellets. Two of them died.
Calitz was one of the police commanders assigned to the operation during the labour unrest at Marikana last year.
He said the police had been threatened and told six times in the hours before the shooting, to leave the Marikana koppie (hill), where the strikers had gathered.
Earlier, Ishmael Semenya, for the police, asked Calitz whether police were sure that methods like verbal orders, use of stun grenades, water cannon, rubber bullets, and the display of force would disperse the crowd. Calitz said: “These methods always work. “People [protesters] take the easiest way out to avoid being shot or arrested.”
He rubbished claims that the mineworkers “misunderstood” the purpose of barbed wired, which led to the chaotic confrontation.
“It [the confrontation] was a deliberate by protesters,” said Calitz. — Sapa

Gripping account of Marikana horror

THIRTEEN months later and with a commission of inquiry investigating circumstances surrounding the massacre still far from being concluded, a riveting book detailing events prior, during and after that fateful August 16 day has been released.

Marikana

Confusion before cops killed, Farlam told

There was confusion among police officers just before two of them were hacked to death at Marikana last year, the Farlam Commission of Inquiry heard on Friday.

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Lonmin miners still live in fear as unions battle

THE man in white Lonmin overalls and black water boots is tired, scared and angry.

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