Exhibit aims to shame prejudice

Upcoming artist Mandilakhe Rolinyathi says he wants to “change how people think about people with skin disorders. I thought I should portray this through art”.
Rolinyathi held a captivating solo exhibition at the launch of Walter Sisulu University’s Artist in Residence at the institution’s art department in East London last week.
Themed Portraits of Diversity, Mdantsane-born Rolinyathi, 33, said he hoped to educate society to be sensitive towards people suffering from skin pigmentation disorders.
Rolinyathi, who is a WSU alumnus, said his portraits, done on wooden pallets, were of a collection of friends and acquaintances.
The nine portraits were on sale for between R2,500 to R4,500 at the exhibition.
“[This is a] platform for reflection and inspection which constructs hierarchies that are often driven by advertising media.
“We want to see more models with vitiligo in magazines and on our screens, so this exhibition is to make people aware that such people exist and beauty is also found in them,” he said. “I started painting when I was in primary school. I used to draw my parents and relatives.
“My love for art carried on until this day,” he said.
The exhibition was attended by some of Rolinyathi’s former lectures, friends and art lovers.
WSU fine arts lecturer Sonwabiso Ngcai said it was the first time the institution had held a “formalised” arts exhibition. “The event is a culmination of what has happened throughout the years.
“We have had exhibitions but this is the first formal exhibition we have had,” he said.
Ngcai applauded Rolinyathi’s work.
“He has grown from what he has been doing. His work has been aesthetic, beautiful, as well as capturing what he wanted to do,” he said.
Ngcai said the arts department had already shortlisted Athenkosi Kwinana, whose work created awareness about albinism, for 2019’s exhibitio
Upcoming artist Mandilakhe Rolinyathi says he wants to “change how people think about people with skin disorders. I thought I should portray this through art”.
Rolinyathi held a captivating solo exhibition at the launch of Walter Sisulu University’s Artist in Residence at the institution’s art department in East London last week.
Themed Portraits of Diversity, Mdantsane-born Rolinyathi, 33, said he hoped to educate society to be sensitive towards people suffering from skin pigmentation disorders.
Rolinyathi, who is a WSU alumnus, said his portraits, done on wooden pallets, were of a collection of friends and acquaintances.
The nine portraits were on sale for between R2,500 to R4,500 at the exhibition.
“[This is a] platform for reflection and inspection which constructs hierarchies that are often driven by advertising media.
“We want to see more models with vitiligo in magazines and on our screens, so this exhibition is to make people aware that such people exist and beauty is also found in them,” he said. “I started painting when I was in primary school. I used to draw my parents and relatives.
“My love for art carried on until this day,” he said.
The exhibition was attended by some of Rolinyathi’s former lectures, friends and art lovers.
WSU fine arts lecturer Sonwabiso Ngcai said it was the first time the institution had held a “formalised” arts exhibition. “The event is a culmination of what has happened throughout the years.
“We have had exhibitions but this is the first formal exhibition we have had,” he said.
Ngcai applauded Rolinyathi’s work.
“He has grown from what he has been doing. His work has been aesthetic, beautiful, as well as capturing what he wanted to do,” he said.
Ngcai said the arts department had already shortlisted Athenkosi Kwinana, whose work created awareness about albinism, for 2019’s exhibitio
Upcoming artist Mandilakhe Rolinyathi says he wants to “change how people think about people with skin disorders. I thought I should portray this through art”.
Rolinyathi held a captivating solo exhibition at the launch of Walter Sisulu University’s Artist in Residence at the institution’s art department in East London last week.
Themed Portraits of Diversity, Mdantsane-born Rolinyathi, 33, said he hoped to educate society to be sensitive towards people suffering from skin pigmentation disorders.
Rolinyathi, who is a WSU alumnus, said his portraits, done on wooden pallets, were of a collection of friends and acquaintances.
The nine portraits were on sale for between R2,500 to R4,500 at the exhibition.
“[This is a] platform for reflection and inspection which constructs hierarchies that are often driven by advertising media.
“We want to see more models with vitiligo in magazines and on our screens, so this exhibition is to make people aware that such people exist and beauty is also found in them,” he said. “I started painting when I was in primary school. I used to draw my parents and relatives.
“My love for art carried on until this day,” he said.
The exhibition was attended by some of Rolinyathi’s former lectures, friends and art lovers.
WSU fine arts lecturer Sonwabiso Ngcai said it was the first time the institution had held a “formalised” arts exhibition. “The event is a culmination of what has happened throughout the years.
“We have had exhibitions but this is the first formal exhibition we have had,” he said.
Ngcai applauded Rolinyathi’s work.
“He has grown from what he has been doing. His work has been aesthetic, beautiful, as well as capturing what he wanted to do,” he said.
Ngcai said the arts department had already shortlisted Athenkosi Kwinana, whose work created awareness about albinism, for 2019’s exhibitio
Rolinyathi held a captivating solo exhibition at the launch of Walter Sisulu University’s Artist in Residence at the institution’s art department in East London last week.
Themed Portraits of Diversity, Mdantsane-born Rolinyathi, 33, said he hoped to educate society to be sensitive towards people suffering from skin pigmentation disorders.
Rolinyathi, who is a WSU alumnus, said his portraits, done on wooden pallets, were of a collection of friends and acquaintances.
The nine portraits were on sale for between R2,500 to R4,500 at the exhibition.
“[This is a] platform for reflection and inspection which constructs hierarchies that are often driven by advertising media.
“We want to see more models with vitiligo in magazines and on our screens, so this exhibition is to make people aware that such people exist and beauty is also found in them,” he said...

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