North Koreans took to the polls - with just one name on the ballot

North Koreans line up to cast their votes on Sunday. With only one name on the ballot paper, there is nothing to fill in or tick. After casting their vote, citizens are expected to participate in cheering outside the polling station.
North Koreans line up to cast their votes on Sunday. With only one name on the ballot paper, there is nothing to fill in or tick. After casting their vote, citizens are expected to participate in cheering outside the polling station. 
Image: Reuters/KCNA

North Koreans went to the polls on Sunday to cast their second vote under the leadership of Kim Jong-Un - with only one approved name on the ballot.

The BBC reported that all North Koreans aged 17 years and older are expected to take part in the election, where voting for the Supreme People's Assembly is mandatory.

Every five years the country holds an election where the turnout rate is always close to 100% . In 2014, state media said it was 99.97%.

Here are five interesting things about the North Korea elections:

  • Voters receive a ballot paper with just one name on it where there is nothing to fill in or tick. 

    Voters take the ballot paper and place it in a ballot box that is out in the open. 

    After casting their vote, citizens are expected to participate in cheering outside the polling station. 

    The parliament is the only legislative body in the country, the BBC said.

    In theory voters can cross out the candidate before casting the ballot, but that is not  a common practice. The Guardian reported. 

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