Germ destroying robots can help in fight against Covid 19

Netcare CEO Richard Friedland says the private hospital group is buying more germ-killing Russian robots, including the Yanex Pulsed-Xenon UV robot, which is useful against antibiotic-resistant bacteria and viruses such as Covid-19.
Netcare CEO Richard Friedland says the private hospital group is buying more germ-killing Russian robots, including the Yanex Pulsed-Xenon UV robot, which is useful against antibiotic-resistant bacteria and viruses such as Covid-19.
Image: MARTIN RHODES

With the increase in the spread of the novel coronavirus in SA, there has been a surge of interest among the public regarding the measures health care providers are taking to prevent the spread of infections.

In 2017, Netcare started to acquire  germ-destroying robots to  bolster  existing measures, said Netcare Group CEO Dr Richard Friedland.

“Both the Xenex pulsed ultraviolet (UV) robots and Yanex Pulsed-Xenon UV robots deployed in Netcare hospitals use high doses of UV light to destroy viruses, bacteria and fungal spores and disinfect hospital wards, theatres and other spaces within minutes,” Friedland said.

Netcare currently has 28 robots operating at 22 sites, and will take delivery of a further 13 within the next few weeks.

The robots emit UV-C spectrum light, which destroys the DNA of bacteria, viruses and fungi to neutralise them and prevent them from replicating.

According to Pharmateknique, marketers of the Yanex disinfection device in SA, the system has the ability to destroy an impressive 99,90% of germs on high-touch surfaces and 99.99% of airborne germs.

The technology is entirely non-toxic, although the area being disinfected must be vacated during the robot’s cycle, as human eyes are sensitive to the UV light.

The Yanex robot, which was designed in Russia, is particularly useful against antibiotic-resistant bacteria and viruses such as Covid-19, which it easily destroys.

“This new technology does not replace the infection risk management protocols and procedures we already have in place, but is used alongside them as an additional line of defence in our arsenal against potentially harmful germs,” said the group's clinical adviser Dr Caroline Maslo, 

“Rigorous disinfection of an area such as a room can be done in just over a minute, which means minimal disruption to busy hospital areas, and the robots can be used 24 hours a day.” 

Each robot used in Netcare facilities is connected to the cloud and the robots generate full reports on all of their activities.


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