J&J booster 85% effective against hospitalisation by Omicron for 1-2 months — SA study

Prof Glenda Gray, head of the SA Medical Research Council, says the J&J booster reduced hospitalisations by 63% in the first two weeks, going up to 85% after that for between one and two months. File image.
Prof Glenda Gray, head of the SA Medical Research Council, says the J&J booster reduced hospitalisations by 63% in the first two weeks, going up to 85% after that for between one and two months. File image.
Image: ESA ALEXANDER

A Johnson & Johnson (J&J) Covid-19 vaccine booster shot is 85% effective in protecting against being hospitalised by the Omicron variant for 1-2 months after it is received, the head of the SA Medical Research Council (SAMRC) said on Friday.

Prof Glenda Grey presented the findings of a SAMRC study at a health ministry briefing on the Covid-19 fourth wave, which has been driven by the new variant.

“We saw an 85% vaccine effectiveness and we saw that this kind of vaccine effectiveness is maintained for up to two months,” she said.

“We are very happy to report very high levels of vaccine effectiveness against Omicron.”

The study involved 477,234 healthcare workers, all of them vaccinated with the J&J shot, of whom 236,000 — roughly half — had received the J&J booster shot.

It looked at hospitalisations among those healthcare workers who had been infected during the fourth wave and found that the booster shot reduced hospitalisations by 63% in the first two weeks after the booster, going up to 85% after that for between one and two months.

“This is the world's first evidence of vaccine effectiveness [against Omicron] using the J&J vaccine,” Gray said.

The SA authorities have thus far maintained a preference for the Pfizer vaccine — they have administered 21-million doses, three times as many as the roughly 7-million J&J vaccine doses.

The data supported already strong global evidence that Omicron can evade vaccine protection when it comes to the initial infection. Among the participants in the study, there were about 30,000 breakthrough infections during the Omicron wave, compared with only around 11,000 each in the previous waves driven by the Delta and Beta variants.

The study also highlighted that those infected with HIV were more vulnerable to being hospitalised with Omicron.

“They [those being hospitalised] are more likely to have HIV and less likely to have other comorbidities as compared to the Beta and Delta period,” Gray said. 

HIV prevalence in South Africa is about 13%.

Reuters


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