Women boxing dying a slow, painful death

Smangele Hadebe receives BSA's Female Prospect of the Year Award from Arnold Schwarzenegger and BSA board member Matilda Kabini.
Smangele Hadebe receives BSA's Female Prospect of the Year Award from Arnold Schwarzenegger and BSA board member Matilda Kabini.
Image: Christo Smith.

Harsh as it may sound, but the truth after scrutinising the
female ratings for October is that women boxing is SA is at death's door. And the deafening silence from Boxing SA
regarding this is worrying.

Interestingly, BSA formed the Women's Boxing Commission in 2016 which comprises BSA board members Zandile Kabini and Letlhogonolo Noge-Tungamarai; boxer Noni Tenge and retired boxers Esther Matshiya and Lizbeth Butler.

The committee was supposed to oversee the implementation of BSA's flagship women's boxing programme.

The mission, according to then chairperson Muditambi Ravele, was to increase women's participation and eliminate challenges that inhibit women from boxing.

But the number of professional females listed in the
October ratings is disappointing. There's one at middleweight; two at junior middleweight and welterweights; one at junior welterweights; three at lightweights; two at junior lightweight, featherweight and flyweights and none at the mini flyweights (which is the smallest of the 17 weight categories).

Some champions such as Hedda Wolmarans are yet to defend, while others like Julie Tshabalala have spent over two years without making
evcen a single defence.

The likes of Smangele "Smash" Hadebe, BSA's 2017 and 2018 prospect of the year award winner, may not fulfil their aspirations of becoming national champions.


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