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‘Where there’s good governance there’s little room for corruption’: Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma

Cooperative governance and traditional affairs minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma says corruption is 'an end result of unethical behaviour, bad governance and non-accountable leadership'. File photo.
Cooperative governance and traditional affairs minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma says corruption is 'an end result of unethical behaviour, bad governance and non-accountable leadership'. File photo.
Image: SIMPHIWE NKWALI

Cooperative governance and traditional affairs minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma says ethics, accountability and transparency in local governance leave little room for corruption.

Dlamini-Zuma, who is reportedly interested in contesting the ANC presidency again, addressed the launch of the local government anti-corruption forum and local government ethical leadership initiative this week. 

“If there’s accountability, you minimise corruption. If there’s integrity you minimise corruption. If you are value-driven you also minimise corruption. We can’t just talk about the end result. You must talk about the whole value chain. 

“If the value chain is right the end result will be right. If the value chain is wrong then the end result will be wrong. We must have ethics, integrity, accountability and good governance,” said Dlamini-Zuma. 

She said corruption was “an end result of unethical behaviour, bad governance and non-accountable leadership”.

If we as leaders do the right thing, then the entire organisation will do the right thing. As leaders, we must be the conscience of the organisation

“If we as leaders do the right thing, then the entire organisation will do the right thing. As leaders, we must be the conscience of the organisation. If you have a conscience, you ensure there is good governance and accountability,” she said.

“At the end of the day, you must be prepared to take responsibility for the wrongdoing. It is people who do wrong, it is not local government as a sphere. It is not government as an institution, it is people who do wrong.”

Dlamini-Zuma welcomed President Cyril Ramaphosa’s appointment of members to the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council.

Ramaphosa made the appointments last month, saying it will advise him on matters related to fighting corruption in line with the national anti-corruption strategy 2020-2030.

It will also provide advisory input on matters related to government’s comprehensive response to the recommendations of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture.

“The National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council is the embodiment of our united resolve as a nation to rid all components of our society of all forms of crime and corruption and develop a whole of society response to and prevention of this scourge,” said Ramaphosa.

The council will enjoy the support of the vast majority of South Africans, who are honest and law-abiding and want our country to succeed

“We have, over a number of years, witnessed the varied impacts of corruption on our public and private sectors. This damage exposed systemic failures as well as shortcomings in personal ethics and commitment to the country.

“The council will enjoy the support of the vast majority of South Africans, who are honest and law-abiding and want our country to succeed. The council will be a source of concern only to those whose days for undermining our development and prosperity are numbered.”

The council is chaired by Prof Firoz Cachalia. Inkosikazi Nomandla Dorothy Mhlauli is deputy chair.

Members of the council include Kavisha Pillay, David Harris Lewis, Nkosana Dolopi, Barbara Schreiner, Nokuzula Gloria Khumalo, Sekoetlane Phamodi and Thandeka Gqubule-Mbeki.

EFF leader Julius Malema said Ramaphosa appointed the council to make it look like he is fighting corruption.

Former DA MP Phumzile Van Damme criticised the appointment of another council, saying Ramaphosa was consistent in forming councils that produce zero results.

“One thing about Ramaphosa, he will form a commission for every problem. Consistency. You could never. How many groups have you set up that achieve nought? Yup. Thought so,” she said.

“I mean he could oversee reform that depoliticises law enforcement, but why do that when you can form a commission?”


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