WATCH | 'When Jerusalema gets in, all measures go out': Kenyan minister urges youth to social distance

Social distancing is defined as a deliberate action to minimise contact with other people and is vitally important during the coronavirus pandemic.
Social distancing is defined as a deliberate action to minimise contact with other people and is vitally important during the coronavirus pandemic.
Image: 123rf.com/Csaba Deli

A video clip of Kenyan health ministry cabinet secretary Mutahi Kagwe urging youth to observe social distancing when taking part in the Jerusalema dance challenge has gone viral on social media.

The video shared on Monday by TV station NTV Kenya is from a Sunday media briefing about Covid-19 infections in the country.

The minister expressed concern about the flouting of preventive measures, particularly by young people in bars and pubs since they were reopened three weeks ago. He said the health ministry had noted an increase in the country's infection rate which could result in a second wave.

“The people in bars who are allowing the new dance, that is now the main thing in those bars. I'm told it is the main activity now, that once Jerusalema gets in, all safety measures go out,” he said.

Kagwe said people are allowed to dance, but urged them to do so while preventing the spread of the coronavirus.

“Please, can you dance Jerusalema while keeping social distancing? I'm told it's not an intimate dance where you need to hold people,” he said.  

Master KG's hit song has become a global favourite since its release in December last year.

Watch the video below:

On Tuesday morning, Kenya had reported 45,076 positive cases and 839 deaths since it registered its first Covid-19 infection on March 13, according to Worldometers.

Nation Africa reports that Kagwe was also critical of politicians who have held political rallies during the pandemic. He said the government has disregarded rules during the rallies, where some people did not wear masks, did not social distance and did not sanitise their hands. 

“There is no doubt we are headed for a second wave of infections,” he said.

“If leaders don't observe the measures, the signal they send to the public is that all is well.

“Somebody has to take responsibility - and this starts with leaders and business owners.”

TimesLIVE


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