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‘What I can do, you can do too’: Nhlanhla ‘Lux’ Dlamini calls on supporters to lead

Nhlanhla 'Lux' Dlamini, aka Ntlantla Mohlauli, was released on R1,500 bail after appearing in the Roodepoort magistrate's court on Monday.
Nhlanhla 'Lux' Dlamini, aka Ntlantla Mohlauli, was released on R1,500 bail after appearing in the Roodepoort magistrate's court on Monday.
Image: SUNDAY TIMES/ ALAISTER RUSSELL

The leader of the Operation Dudula Movement Nhlanhla “Lux” Dlamini told Operation Dudula members on Monday they need to identify themselves as leaders and fight for their cause alongside him, rather than look up to him.

Dlamini addressed his supporters outside the Roodepoort magistrate’s court after he was released on R1,500 bail. He spent the weekend in police cells after his arrest on Thursday.

“I am not smarter than most people who are here, the difference is that I take action more than people. People speak too much. I’m telling you that because I’m not smarter, that means what I can do, you can do too. You don’t have to rely on Nhlanhla Lux being alive for the black nation or SA to prosper,” he said.

Dlamini said there was a growing demand for leadership in various parts of Soweto, where the movement began its operations last year. 

“I am tired of leaving Pimville and going to Diepkloof because Diepkloof does not have electricity. Where is the leadership of Diepkloof? Some of us are not here to hoard the positions of leadership, some of us are here to share the skill of leadership so that we can all rise together,” he said to a cheering crowd. 

Dlamini was arrested over the alleged ransacking of Victor Ramerafe’s home in Soweto by the group’s supporters, acting on information they said they had received that linked him to “drug dealing”.

Dlamini said his generation was the only one capable of liberating black people, claiming the younger ones were “too drunk and high” to do anything.

“Struggle veterans like Steve Biko are not resting in peace because this is not what they died for. We can all do better. All of us know where drugs are sold. I’ve heard that I will not be around for two weeks before I’m killed, I will be the happiest person underground because I would have died for my people,” he said.


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